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Abbreviated Pundit Abstract: COVID aid is across the nook

Will Bunch / Philly.com:

Why Biden needs a prime-time speech from the Oval Office to declare war on voter suppression

But the ultimate goal of a national Biden address must be to pressurize centrist lawmakers to do what is morally right, and Quit the filibuster – a holdover of the same White domination politics Selma gave us that in 1965 – and passed a federal guarantee of voting rights for all Americans.

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The GOP's argument about the 1/6 Commission seems increasingly to be: "Al-Qaeda was wrongly excluded from the 9/11 Commission."

– Garrett M. Graff (@vermontgmg) February 25, 2021

Dave A. Hopkins / Honest Graft:

Of course, Biden is running for re-election

The post The report mentions, almost casually, that while Biden will wait until after half-time to set up a formal re-election campaign and publicly declare his candidacy, his advisors "work on the assumption that he will lead the Democratic ticket again in 2024." . "This could be for some shocking news; I've met several politically conscious people since Biden's first launch in 2020 who assume he would only seek a single term. But it shouldn't come as a surprise at all.

The idea of ​​the self-proclaimed one-term president had romantically appealed to editorial page writers (and few others) long before Biden became the oldest person in history to be elected to the job. Like many other ideas with romantic appeal, it is disconnected from political reality. Calling yourself a lame duck from the start is not an effective strategy for a president to build or maintain influence inside and outside the party. The perception that you could be there for a while is a much better way to attract talented subordinates, pursue ambitious goals, and press members of Congress for support, and the inability to seek re-election is one reason why the second Modern presidents' terms tend to be less focused and successful than their first.

Christopher Hooks/ Texas monthly:

Who is responsible for the Texas blackouts?

Our governor and lawmaker want everyone but themselves to be held responsible for the February blackouts, the most recent crisis they caused.

This is how our state government usually works. Elected leaders do their best to ignore real problems that only they can solve, giving them more time to manage the affairs of city governments and arguing about who should use which toilets. When someone forces them to acknowledge what is not working – as was done in the CPS case by a crusade judge, journalists and lawyers – many state officials say they are shocked by the sloppiness of the systems they oversee. And then mostly they make token changes and move on.

From a self-preservation perspective, this approach works wonderfully. Heads of state rarely have to pay the whistler because many Texans don't need or expect much from state government day to day, apart from, for example, maintaining highways. When the state is innately incapable, many Texans can say that this is a problem that happens to someone else.

But what if something happened that exposed Texans from all over the state and every walks of life to this inability? On the night of Sunday, February 14, as Texas sank into darkness and cold and the lights and water went out, the incompetence of the state government ceased to be someone else's problem.

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In theory there is a GOP civil war against Trump. In practice, the Rs of Congress are rapidly moving towards lockside opposition to Biden – just like Obama. And in red states, GOP lawmakers are locking guns in order to instigate a huge wave of laws to suppress voters. The direction of the party is clear https://t.co/VNn6uBamZn

– Ronald Brownstein (@RonBrownstein) February 24, 2021

Charles P Pierce / Esquire:

The cynical Republican attack on the COVID relief bill could work. It would not be the first time.

Still, everything feels very different than in 2009.

Let's be honest. The COVID relief package that Republicans are sure will hit the administration back is one of the most popular pieces of legislation in general the last three decades. A CBS poll had a second COVID relief package poll north of 80 percent. One more round FREE MONEY! is supported by seven out of ten Americans. All of the old conservative Bugaboos – especially The Deficit – were made toothless. People want something to be done, and given the severity of the situation, they seem to focus on the people who are most committed to something. This shouldn't be complicated, but it does seem to be beyond the minorities of Congress in both houses of Congress.

And to their eternal merit, the government has made it clear that it will do it alone if necessary, and it waves half measures aside the stupid alternative suggestion on the minimum wage proposed by Mitt Romney and Tom Cotton.

Glen Kessler / WaPo:

Analysis of the house's GOP spin against Biden's $ 1.9 trillion auxiliary bill

House Republicans oppose the $ 1.9 trillion move President Biden and the Democrats in Congress are pushing to address the problem Coronavirus Pandemic and its economic consequences. As part of the attack, the GOP employees of the House Budget Committee dispersed A pie chart which claims only a small part of the bill actually deals with fighting the virus.

In his remarks (Rep. Jason T. Smith (R-Mo.), Top Republican on the House Budgets Committee) listed a number of objections to the bill. Let's take a tour of them and offer a review. Some of the claims have to do with secret budget issues while others reflect a more philosophical argument. As this is a reader's guide, we won't be giving a Pinocchio rating. However, readers should be aware that some of these points are not on the base or stretched.

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Both parties were against September 11th. Most of the Dems gathered around Bush instead of blaming him. Both parties wanted to know what happened. Investigation slightly non-partisan.
Only one party is against 1/6. Most of the GOPs have worked to apologize or cover up part of it. Non-partisan investigations will be difficult.

– Nicholas Grossman (@ NGrossman81) February 24, 2021

Jonathan Chait / New York Magazine:

The future of conservatism is Flight 93 elections forever

As a result, there was a minor incident at the Capitol on January 6th that was disproportionately blown up by the corporate media. "As with any large crowd – especially one filled with unrealistic hopes – some showed up looking for trouble," he writes. In short, dozens of police officers have been hospitalized, some right-wing extremists roamed the halls of Congress to execute some elected officials, yadda yadda yadda.

The most interesting thing about (Michael) Anton's paper is that he has not taken up the question that he originally raised four years ago. If Trump's election was a gamble to save the country, did it work? Did the plane land or did it crash?

Instead of answering the question, Anton simply presents the schedule for the apocalyptic confrontation. The forces of progressivism are renewing their totalitarian program. Trump's "sensible program" is classified as "indistinguishable from fascism". (By whom? He doesn't tell us.) Also, as a side note, “The government is preparing to take action with new laws proposed by Senator Dick Durbin and apparently approved by President Biden in his inaugural address that will Language criminalizes by associating the regime's opposition with "white supremacy" and "terror". How will a law criminalizing opposition to the government win the support of at least ten Republican senators? Then why should five Supreme Court justices ignore the obvious challenge of such a law by making the first amendment? Anton is too hysterical to tell us.

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Fox News host Tucker Carlson downplayed the role of white supremacists in the Capitol uprising. Https://t.co/fMkU3lRTOB Of course it did. White supremacists are its core demographics.

– Bruce Bartlett (@BruceBartlett) February 24, 2021

Cameron Joseph / VICE News:

Why the last chairman of the CPAC is staying away from this year's big Trump festival

With the Trump-heavy cast of the event, the emphasis on electoral fraud and the lack of ideological diversity, former chairman Al Cardenas doesn't want any part of it

Al Cardenas, former chairman of the American Conservative Union (CPAC's parent organization), told VICE News that he expected Trump to put out "a laundry list of demands on loyalists" using his Sunday speech – the first public address since leaving office Air "a number of ailments." He warned that anyone promoting Trump's election fraud lie would further damage democracy. And he lamented the lack of ideological and racial diversity in this year's CPAC lineup.

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Americans of all ages, educational levels, sex, race, and political party say they are more likely to get the coronavirus vaccine – except Republicans. https://t.co/Fkb2FDOPXX

– Axios (@axios) February 25, 2021

Christian Vanderbrouk / Bulwark:

MAGA's moment of weakness

Trump and his allies have been defeated, humiliated and betrayed. It's time to sweep your leg.Share on TwitterShare via emaiTo press

Whatever the future holds, right now the twice-accused one-year-old president and his movement positively reek of the stink of defeat.

They seething behind their brave faces and plan revenge on high-ranking defectors. Since the 2016 Cleveland Republican National Convention, Trump's position within his own party has not been so precarious and exposed.

The lack of reciprocity for a wave of recent treason is illuminating.

Liz Cheney held onto her place in the leadership of the House after voting for the indictment and indictment Trump accused of having blood on his hands.

Despite agreeing to the acquittal, Senate Minority Chairman Mitch McConnell declared Trump "practically and morally responsible" for the January 6 events.

The second largest Republican in the Senate, John Thune, stressed that his not guilty voice "should not be taken as discharge" and called the former president's anti-democratic behavior "inexcusable".

Will McConnell or Thune pay a price for their infidelity in the near future? Unlikely.

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